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Inside the church of Santi Apostoli in the Cannaregio district of Venice. 
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Inside the church of Santi Apostoli in the Cannaregio district of Venice.

The Chiesa dei Santi Apostoli di Cristo, commonly called Santi Apostoli, is one of the oldest churches in the city although it has undergone numerous changes since its foundation. The present building is the result of a major reconstruction project which was undertaken in 1575.

In the 7th century Venice was not yet a city, but a collection of small communities scattered throughout the lagoon. Saint Magnus, the Bishop of Oderzo, came to the lagoon and founded eight churches. According to a legend recounted by the historian Flaminio Cornaro, St. Magnus had a vision of the Twelve Apostles who commanded him to build a church on a site where he saw twelve cranes. The church presently stands on the Campo dei Santi Apostoli at the beginning of the Strada Nuova (New Road).

The church retains its 16th century layout: a single nave supported by two rows of columns. The ceiling fresco is Communion of the Apostles and the Triumph of the Eucharist by Fabio Canal. (Text based on Wikipedia).

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Restored 14th-century frescoes in the Camposanto complex in Pisa, Italy. 
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Restored 14th-century frescoes in the Camposanto complex in Pisa, Italy.

Wikipedia: The Campo Santo, also known as Camposanto Monumentale ("monumental cemetery") or Camposanto Vecchio ("old cemetery"), is a historical edifice at the northern edge of the Cathedral Square. "Campo Santo" can be literally translated as "holy field", because it is said to have been built around a shipload of sacred soil from Golgotha, brought back to Pisa from the Fourth Crusade by Ubaldo de' Lanfranchi, archbishop of Pisa in the 12th century. The building was the fourth and last one to be raised in the Cathedral Square. It dates from a century after the bringing of the soil from Golgotha, and was erected over the earlier burial ground. The construction of this huge, oblong Gothic cloister was begun in 1278 by the architect Giovanni di Simone. He died in 1284 when Pisa suffered a defeat in the naval battle of Meloria against the Genoans. The cemetery was only completed in 1464.

The walls were once covered in frescoes; the first were applied in 1360, the last about three centuries later. The first was the Crucifixion by Francesco Traini, in the south western side. Then, continuing to right, in the southern side, the Last Judgement, The Hell, The Triumph of Death and the Anacoreti nella Tebaide, usually attributed to Buonamico Buffalmacco. The cycle of frescoes continues with the Stories of the Old Testament by Benozzo Gozzoli (15th century) that were situated in the north gallery, while in the south arcade were the Stories of Pisan Saints, by Andrea Bonaiuti, Antonio Veneziano and Spinello Aretino (between 1377 and 1391), and the Stories of Job, by Taddeo Gaddi (end of 14th century). In the same time, in the north gallery were the Stories of the Genesis by Piero di Puccio. On 27 July 1944, a bomb fragment from an Allied raid started a fire. Due to all the water tanks being controlled, the fire could not be put out in time, and it burnt the wooden rafters and melted the lead of the roof. The destruction of the roof severely damaged everything inside the cemetery, destroying most of the sculptures and sarcophagi and compromising all the frescoes. After World War II, restoration work began. The roof was restored as closely as possible to its pre-war appearance and the frescoes were separated from the walls to be restored and displayed elsewhere. Once the frescoes had been removed, the preliminary drawings, called sinopie were also removed. These under-drawings were separated using the same technique used on the frescoes and now they are in the Museum of the Sinopie, on the opposite side of the Square. The restored frescoes that still exist are gradually being transferred to their original locations in the cemetery, inside the cemetery, to restore the Campo Santo's pre-war appearance.

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The Camposanto demolished after an Allied bombing raid in 1944Medieval frescoes in the Camposanto in PisaMedieval frescoes in the Camposanto in PisaMedieval frescoes in the Camposanto in PisaMedieval frescoes in the Camposanto in PisaMedieval frescoes in the Camposanto in PisaMedieval frescoes in the Camposanto in PisaMedieval frescoes in the Camposanto in PisaMedieval frescoes in the Camposanto in PisaMedieval frescoes in the Camposanto in Pisa
The famous Brancacci Chapel in the Church of Santa Maria del Carmine in Florence, Italy. 
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The famous Brancacci Chapel in the Church of Santa Maria del Carmine in Florence, Italy.

Wikipedia: "It is sometimes called the "Sistine Chapel of the early Renaissance" for its painting cycle, among the most famous and influential of the period. Construction of the chapel was commissioned by Pietro Brancacci and begun in 1386. Public access is currently gained via the neighbouring convent, designed by Brunelleschi. The church and the chapel are treated as separate places to visit and as such have different opening times and it is quite difficult to see the rest of the church from the chapel.

The patron of the pictorial decoration was Felice Brancacci, descendant of Pietro, who had served as the Florentine ambassador to Cairo until 1423. Upon his return to Florence, he hired Masolino da Panicale to paint his chapel. Masolino's associate, 21 year old Masaccio, 18 years younger than Masolino, assisted, but during painting Masolino left to Hungary, where he was painter to the king, and the commission was given to Masaccio. By the time Masolino returned he was learning from his talented former student. However, Masaccio was called to Rome before he could finish the chapel, and died in Rome at the age of 27. Portions of the chapel were completed later by Filippino Lippi. Unfortunately during the Baroque period some of the paintings were seen as unfashionable and a tomb was placed in front of them.

Masaccio's application of scientific perspective, unified lighting, use of chiaroscuro and skill in rendering the figures naturalistically established new traditions in Renaissance Florence that some scholars credit with helping to found the new Renaissance style.

The young Michelangelo was one of the many artists who received his artistic training by copying Masaccio's work in the chapel. The chapel was also the site of an assault on Michelangelo by rival sculptor Pietro Torrigiano, who resented Michelangelo's critical remarks about his draughtsmanship. He punched the artist so severely that he "crushed his nose like a biscuit" (according to Benvenuto Cellini), which deformed Michelangelo's face into that of a boxer's.

The first restoration of the chapel frescoes was in 1481-1482, by Filippino Lippi, who was also responsible for completing the cycle. Due to the lamps used for lighting the dark chapel, the frescoes were relatively quickly coated in dust and dirt from the smoke. Another restoration was conducted at the end of the 16th century. Around 1670, sculptures were added, and the fresco-secco additions were made to the frescoes, to hide the various cases of nudity. Late 20th century restoration removed the overpainting and collected dust and dirt. Some critics, including professor and art historian James H. Beck, have criticised these efforts, while others, including professors, historians and restorers, have praised the work done on the chapel.".

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Frescoes in the Brancacci Chapel: "St. Peter Healing the Sick with His Shadow" by MasaccioFrescoes in the Brancacci Chapel: "The Crucifixion of St. Peter" by Filippino LippiFrescoes in the Brancacci Chapel: "St. Paul Visiting St. Peter in Prison" by Filippino LippiFrescoes in the Brancacci Chapel: detail from "Healing of the Cripple and Raising of Tabitha" by MasolinoFrescoes in the Brancacci ChapelFrescoes in the Brancacci Chapel: fragment of "Expulsion from the Garden of Eden" by MasaccioFrescoes in the Brancacci ChapelFrescoes in the Brancacci Chapel: fragment of "The Distribution of Alms and Death of Ananias" by MasaccioFrescoes in the Brancacci Chapel: Adam from "The Temptation of Adam and Eve" by MasolinoFrescoes in the Brancacci Chapel: Eve from "The Temptation of Adam and Eve" by MasolinoFrescoes in the Brancacci Chapel: "St. Peter Being Freed from Prison" by Filippino LippiFrescoes in the Brancacci ChapelFrescoes in the Brancacci Chapel: fragment of "The Crucifixion of St. Peter" by Filippino Lippi
Inside the Chiesa Nuova in Rome, also known as Santa Maria in Vallicella, built in late 16th century as the principal church of the Oratorian congregation. 
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Inside the Chiesa Nuova in Rome, also known as Santa Maria in Vallicella, built in late 16th century as the principal church of the Oratorian congregation.
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Inside the 16th century church of Il Gesù in Rome. 
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Inside the 16th century church of Il Gesù in Rome.

This baroque church, located in the Piazza del Gesù, is the mother church of the Jesuit order. It introduced the baroque style into architecture and served as model for innumerable Jesuit churches all over the world. Although Michelangelo, at the request of the Spanish cardinal Bartolomeo de la Cueva, offered, out of devotion, to design the church for free, the endeavor was funded by Cardinal Alessandro Farnese, grandson of Pope Paul III, the pope who had authorized the founding of the Society of Jesus. Ultimately, the main architects involved in the construction were Giacomo Barozzi da Vignola, architect of the Farnese family, and Giacomo della Porta. The most striking feature of the interior decoration is the ceiling fresco is the grandiose Triumph of the Name of Jesus by Giovanni Battista Gaulli. Gaulli also frescoed the cupola, including lantern and pendentives, central vault, window recesses, and transepts' ceilings. (Text based on Wikipedia).
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Frescoes in the Il Gesù church in RomeFrescoes in the Il Gesù church in Rome
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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
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