Not working? Install DevalVR, QT or Flash  polski English RSS feedFollow us on TwitterFollow me on Pinterest
Search in panoramas:
»
On the square in front of the church of San Giobbe in the Cannaregio district of Venice. 
Click to view this panorama in new fullscreen window
On the square in front of the church of San Giobbe in the Cannaregio district of Venice.

"Its principal entrance is a very fine example of early Renaissance sculpture. Note in it, especially, its beautiful use of the flower of the convolvulus. There are said to be still more beautiful examples of the same period, in the interior." (John Ruskin: The Stones of Venice).
• Added to the gallery on File size: 2.8 MBViews: 2467 (#2146)
Inside the church of San Geremia in the Cannaregio district of Venice. 
Click to view this panorama in new fullscreen window
Inside the church of San Geremia in the Cannaregio district of Venice.

Wikipedia: "The edifice is popular as the seat of the cult of Saint Lucy of Syracuse, whose remains are housed inside.

The first church was erected here in the 11th century, and was later rebuilt on several occasions. In 1206 it is mentioned to house the remains of St. Magnus of Oderzo (died 670), who had taken refuge in this area from the Lombards. A first rebuilding was held under doge Sebastiano Ziani, the new church being consecrated in 1292. The current edifice dates from 1753, designed by Carlo Corbellini; the façade is from 1861. The brickwork bell tower (probably dating from the 12th century) has two thin Romanesque mullioned windows at the base.

The interior has rather sober walls. The altar and its presbytery are notable, with two statues of St. Peter and St. Jeremy Apostle (1798). A work by Palma the Younger (The Virgin at the Incoronation of Venice by St. Magnus) decorates the fourth altar.

The church is object of pilgrimages and wide devotion for the presence of the relics of Saint Lucy, which were carried here in 1861 when the church dedicated to her was demolished. In 1955 Angelo Roncalli, future Pope John XXIII and then Patriarch of Venice, had a silver mask put on the saint's face to protect it from dust. The saint's body was stolen on July 7, 1981, but was restored in December of the same year without any ransom".

• Added to the gallery on File size: 3.5 MBViews: 2595 (#2080)
Santa Lucia, pray for us
Campo San Geremia in the Cannaregio district of Venice. 
Click to view this panorama in new fullscreen window
Campo San Geremia in the Cannaregio district of Venice.

Wikipedia: "The nearby Palazzo Labia is known for the remarkable frescoed ballroom painted 1746–47 by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, with decorative works in trompe l'oeil by Gerolamo Mengozzi-Colonna. [...]

The Labia family, who commissioned the palazzo, were originally Spanish and bought their way into nobility in 1646, hence considered arriviste by the old Venetian aristocracy. The wars with the Ottomans had depleted the coffers of the Republic of Venice which then sold inscriptions into nobility, thus giving political clout. It has been said that they compensated their lack of ancestors by a great display of wealth. Today the Palazzo Labia is the sole remaining example of this ostentation. [...]

The wealth and power of the Labia family declined with the fall of the Serene Republic in 1797. During the 19th century the Palazzo fell into decay. This coincided with a period where Tiepolo's work was unpopular and unappreciated. In 1945 a munitions boat exploded close to the palazzo, shattering its already precarious foundations, and causing fragments of the ballroom frescoes to fall to the ground.

In 1948 the palazzo acquired a new owner, Don Carlos de Beistegui (Charlie de Beistegui), French-born heir to a Franco-Mexican fortune, who began an intensive restoration. Beistegui was a skilled natural interior decorator, and for the derelict palazzo, he purchased furnishings acquired from the palazzo's less fortunate neighbours, including frescoes by Raphael, Annibale Carracci, and Guido Reni. These works of art, coupled with newly acquired tapestries and antiques, restored to the palazzo its former splendour. [...]

On 3 September 1951 Don Carlos held a a masquerade ball, Le Bal oriental, at the Palazzo Labia. It was one of the largest and most lavish social events of the 20th century. It launched the career of the Venetian fashion designer Pierre Cardin, who designed about 30 of the costumes worn by members of the "dolce vita" who attended. Christian Dior and Salvador Dalí designed each other's costumes. Cecil Beaton's photographs of the ball display an almost surreal society, reminiscent of the Venetian life immediately before the fall of the republic at the end of the 18th century. The party was to be one of the last truly spectacular events in the famous ballroom.".

• Added to the gallery on File size: 4.2 MBViews: 2533 (#2112)
Page
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Locate all panoramas
Random image
Contact
Interested?
Mail me at
panoramy@zbooy.pl
Last comment
Wednesday, Oct 13, 2010: The shooting target at the Axalp-Ebenfluh aerial firing range in the Swiss Alps, with looters searching for bullets after the end of the first day of the annual Axalp Air Power Demonstration
Axalp-Ebenfluh firing range (2)
1st you have made so good and nice pictures of the airshow. 2nd I cant believe what you are holding there in front of a sign saying not to touch any remainings of ammo. How stupid (sorry) is this? Its dangerous, look at the one whos holding the yellow shell, this is most prob a HEI round; because of people like you, all the show get more and more restricted. Can you imagine what it means [...] (Andy)
© Szymon "Zbooy" Madej
2005–2017