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The Chapel of the Passion Relics in the Basilica of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome. 
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The Chapel of the Passion Relics in the Basilica of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome.

This modern chapel, built in 1930, houses many relics of the Passion of Christ: two thorns from the crown of thorns; a nail from the Crucifixion; the Titulus, part of the Title of the Cross originally bearing the words "Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews"; three splinters of the True Cross; a part of the cross of the good thief; fragments from the Pillar of the Scourging; and the finger that Saint Thomas placed in Christ's side.
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Inside the Basilica of Saint Sebastian outside the Walls in Rome. 
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Inside the Basilica of Saint Sebastian outside the Walls in Rome.

Wikipedia: Built originally in the first half of the 4th century, the basilica is dedicated to St. Sebastian, a popular Roman martyr of the 3rd century. The name ad catacumbas refers to the catacombs of St Sebastian, over which the church was built, while "fuori le mura" refers to the fact that the church is built outside the Aurelian Walls, and is used to differentiate the basilica from the church of San Sebastiano al Palatino on the Palatine Hill. According to the founding tradition, in 258, during the Valerian persecutions, the catacombs were temporarily used as place of sepulture of two other saints martyred in Rome, Peter and Paul, whose remains were later transferred to the two basilicas carrying their names: whence the original dedication of the church, Basilica Apostolorum ("Basilica of the Apostles"). The dedication to Sebastian dates to the 9th century.

Sebastian's remains were moved here around 350. They were transferred to St. Peter's in 826, fearing a Saracen assault: the latter, in fact, materialized, and the church was destroyed. The building was refounded under Pope Nicholas I (858-867), while the martyr's altar was reconsecrated by Honorius III (1216-1227), by request of the Cistercians, who had received the place. In the 13th century the arcade of the triple nave was walled in.

The current edifice is largely a 17th-century construction, commissioned by Cardinal Scipione Borghese in 1609 from Flaminio Ponzio and, after Ponzio's death in 1613, entrusted to Giovanni Vasanzio, who completed it.

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Inside the Church of Domine Quo Vadis in Via Appia Antica in Rome. 
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Inside the Church of Domine Quo Vadis in Via Appia Antica in Rome.

"The Church of St Mary in Palmis, better known as Chiesa del Domine Quo Vadis, is a small church southeast of Rome, central Italy. It is located about some 800 m from Porta San Sebastiano, where the Via Ardeatina branches off the Appian Way, on the site where, according to the legend, Saint Peter met Jesus while the former was fleeing persecution in Rome. According to the apocryphal Acts of Peter, Peter asked Jesus, "Lord, where are you going?" (Latin: Domine, quo vadis?). Jesus answered, "I am going to Rome to be crucified again". There has been a sanctuary on the spot since the ninth century, but the current church is from 1637. The current façade was added in the 17th century." (Text from Wikipedia).
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Imprint of Christ's feet in the Domine Quo Vadis churchBust of Henryk Sienkiewicz in the Domine Quo Vadis church
Inside the Basilica of San Giovanni a Porta Latina ("Saint John Before the Latin Gate") near the Porta Latina of the Aurelian Wall in Rome. 
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Inside the Basilica of San Giovanni a Porta Latina ("Saint John Before the Latin Gate") near the Porta Latina of the Aurelian Wall in Rome.

"S. Giovanni was originally built by St Gelasius (492–96), rebuilt by Hadrian I in 772 and reconsecrated by Celestine III in 1191; subsequently it was restored several times. Nevertheless the interior prserves the rare simplicity of its very early origins. Beautiful antique columns of varying style line the aisles; these lead to two minor apses, flanking the main one, in the oriental fashion. A most unusual feature in Rome, the main apse is pierced by three windows, but rarer still, all three apses are polygonal on the outside. A soft golden light filters through the thin sheets of selenite in the windows, illuminating some faded but exceedingly interesting twelfth-century frescoes high up on both sides of the nave (scenes from Old and New Testaments) and in the presbytery (symbols of the evangelists and the twenty-four Elders of the Apocalypse in two rows)." (Georgina Masson: The Companion Guide to Rome, Woodbridge 2009).
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12th-century frescoes in the church of San Giovanni a Porta Latina12th-century frescoes in the church of San Giovanni a Porta Latina12th-century frescoes in the church of San Giovanni a Porta Latina
Inside the Basilica of Saint Lawrence outside the Walls (San Lorenzo fuori le mura) in Rome. 
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Inside the Basilica of Saint Lawrence outside the Walls (San Lorenzo fuori le mura) in Rome.

"What makes this church so architecturally fascinating is the fact that the present building is formed from the union of two plainly visible structures. As one proceeds down the nave and up the steps to the altar (all belonging to the thirteenth-century building), the capitals and upper shafts of the columns of the original sixth-century church come into view on either side. Leaning over the railing of the chancel, you can see the rest of these columns with their bases and pedestals twelve feet below." (Robert Kahn (Ed.): City Secrets Rome: The Essential Insider’s Guide, 2011).
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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
Palácio da Pena
Czy to już jest koniec? :( (widz)
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2005–2017