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The Duke of Aosta Square in front of the Central Railway Station in Milan, Italy. 
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The Duke of Aosta Square in front of the Central Railway Station in Milan, Italy.

The tall building nearby is the 127-metre Pirelli Tower from the 60s. Late afternoon on April 18, 2002, a Rockwell Commander 112, an airplane with a single engine registered in Switzerland, hit the building. The aircraft was apparently scheduled to fly from Locarno to Milan. The plane was low on fuel and Linate Airport was preparing an emergency landing prior to the crash, but the pilot suddenly wandered off and flew right into the building. The pilot and two people inside the tower were killed in the accident. (Text based on Wikipedia).
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On the campanile of St. Mark's Basilica in Venice. 
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On the campanile of St. Mark's Basilica in Venice.

"It is one of the most recognizable symbols of the city.

The tower is 98.6 metres (323 ft) tall, and stands alone in a corner of St Mark's Square, near the front of the basilica. It has a simple form, the bulk of which is a fluted brick square shaft, 12 metres (39 ft) wide on each side and 50 metres (160 ft) tall, above which is a loggia surrounding the belfry, housing five bells. The belfry is topped by a cube, alternate faces of which show the Lion of St. Mark and the female representation of Venice (la Giustizia). The tower is capped by a pyramidal spire, at the top of which sits a golden weathervane in the form of the archangel Gabriel. The campanile reached its present form in 1514. The current tower was reconstructed in its present form in 1912 after the collapse of 1902. The tower is currently undergoing structural repairs in order to halt its subsidence." (Wikipedia)

"There are certain surprises in the view from the campanile. One is that none of the water of the city is visible—not a gleam—except a few yards of the Grand Canal and a stretch of the Canale della Giudecca; the houses are too high for any of the by-ways to be seen. Another revelation is that the floor pattern of the Piazza has no relation to its sides. The roofs of Venice we observe to be neither red nor brown, but something between the two. Looking first to the north, over the three flagstaffs and the pigeon feeders and the Merceria clock, we see away across the lagoon the huge sheds of the dirigibles and (to the left) the long railway causeway joining Venice to the mainland as by a thread. Immediately below us in the north-east are the domes of S. Mark's, surmounted by the graceful golden balls on their branches, springing from the leaden roof, and farther off are the rising bulk of SS. Giovanni e Paolo, with its derivative dome and golden balls, the leaning tower of S. Maria del Pianto, and beyond this the cemetery and Murano." (E. V. Lucas: A Wanderer in Venice, New York 1914).

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The church of Santa Maria della Salute from St. Mark's Campanile in VeniceThe domes of Saint Mark's Basilica in Venice
The bell tower of the San Giorgio Maggiore church in Venice. 
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The bell tower of the San Giorgio Maggiore church in Venice.
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An armless statue on a dome of San Giorgio Maggiore church in VeniceTicket to the campanile of the San Giorgio Maggiore church in Venice
The Two Towers of Bologna, Italy, in the middle of a snowy night. 
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The Two Towers of Bologna, Italy, in the middle of a snowy night.

The Two Towers, both of them leaning, are the symbol of the city. They are located at the intersection of the roads that lead to the five gates of the old ring wall. The taller one is called the Asinelli while the smaller but more leaning tower is called the Garisenda. Their names derive from the families which are traditionally credited for their construction between 1109 and 1119.

It is believed that the Asinelli Tower initially had a height of ca. 70 m and was raised only later to the current 97.2 m (with an overhanging rock of 2.2 m). In the 14th century the city became its owner and used it as prison and small stronghold. During this period a wooden construction was added around the tower at a height of 30 m above ground, which was connected with an aerial footbridge (later destroyed during a fire in 1398) to the Garisenda Tower.

Severe damage was caused by lightning that often resulted in small fires and collapses, and only in 1824 was a lightning rod installed. The tower survived, however, at least two documented large fires: the first in 1185 was due to arson and the second one in 1398 has already been mentioned above.

The Asinelli Tower was used by the scientists Giovanni Battista Riccioli (in 1640) and Giovanni Battista Guglielmini (in the following century) for experiments to study the motion of heavy bodies and the earth rotation. In World War II, between 1943 and 1945, it was used as a sight post: during bombing attacks, four volunteers took post at the top to direct rescue operations to places hit by allied bombs. Later, a RAI television relay was installed on top.

The Garisenda Tower has today a height of 48 m with an overhang of 3.2 m. Initially it was approximately 60 m high, but had to be lowered in the 14th century due to a yielding of the ground which left it slanting and dangerous. (Text based on Wikipedia).

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Torre Guinigi in Lucca is famous for its helm oak grove on top. 
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Torre Guinigi in Lucca is famous for its helm oak grove on top.

"The trap-door opened, and we emerged on a grassy platform. The platform was shaded by a cluster of ancient bay-trees that had grown and flourished spite of the wind and the storms of centuries, looking fresh and green in their old age as our aged companion, who was glad to sink on a seat to rest. The view was glorious. At our feet lay the fair city and all its elegant buildings, winding streets, numerous monasteries, with their low towers pierced by open galleries; ancient churches, divided from the streets by gardens and trees; open piazzas breaking the uniformity of the lines of streets, stretching away towards the several gates, all belted round by the strong walls, fringed with trees, and encircled by a broad extent of green esplanade, enclosing the beautiful city like a cestus of beauty. On one side appeared the Duomo, with its long lines of extensive roofs and lofty campanile, just under the fortifications; farther on was the spacious ducal palace, rising out of its pretty planted piazza, and other notable churches and buildings all mapped out before us. Beyond the walls the waters of the river Serchio wound in silvery lines through the smiling plains, teeming with cultivation. Mountains entirely hemmed in the level ground, of every shape, of every shade, from the sternest precipices of dark rocky crags to the green and fertile mountain, the little Borgos nestling amid the chesnut woods, and splendid villas peeping forth from amid the deep groves of bay and ilex." (Florentia: The Baths of Lucca, "The New Monthly Magazine", Vol. 110, London 1857).
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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
Palácio da Pena
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