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The dilapidated village of Lalkholi on the road from Mestia to Ushguli in Svaneti, Georgia. 
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The dilapidated village of Lalkholi on the road from Mestia to Ushguli in Svaneti, Georgia.
• Added to the gallery on File size: 3.5 MBViews: 1850 (#2562)
A typical Svaneti villageThe road to Ushguli
Among the medieval koshki towers of the Ushguli village in Svaneti, Georgia. 
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Among the medieval koshki towers of the Ushguli village in Svaneti, Georgia.
• Added to the gallery on File size: 4.9 MBViews: 1989 (#2503)
The view from the Torre dei Lamberti in the centre of Verona, Italy. 
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The view from the Torre dei Lamberti in the centre of Verona, Italy.
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Three men and a bicycle. Verona
The view from the Torrazzo, the bell tower of the Cathedral of Cremona in Lombardy, Italy. 
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The view from the Torrazzo, the bell tower of the Cathedral of Cremona in Lombardy, Italy.

Wikipedia: At 112.7 metres (343 ft 6 in), it is the third tallest brickwork bell tower in the world, the first being the tower of St. Martin's Church in Landshut, Bavaria, the second being that of the Church of Our Lady in Bruges, Belgium. However the Torrazzo (completed in 1309) is older than the Landshut tower (completed in 1500) and the Bruges tower (completed in 1465), and it is the oldest brick structure taller than 100 m that is still standing.

According to popular tradition, construction on the tower began in 754. In reality, it was built in four phases: a first dating back to the 1230s, up to the third dripstone, a second, between 1250 and 1267, up to the dripstone under the quadriphore, a third around 1284, and the completion of the marble spire in 1309.

Its height is announced by a plaque embedded in the wall at the base of the Torrazzo itself, stating 250 arms and 2 ounces, which in the ancient measuring system of the Lombard towns translates to approximately 111 metres".

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Cremona: ticket to the TorrazzoCremona: 502 steps to the TorrazzoCremona: the stairs inside the TorrazzoCremona: the view from the TorrazzoCremona: the view from the TorrazzoCremona: the top of the Torrazzo
On the rain-soaked top of the medieval Torre Gombito in Upper Bergamo, Italy. 
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On the rain-soaked top of the medieval Torre Gombito in Upper Bergamo, Italy.

"The tower stands at the intersection where the Roman cardus and decumanus maximus streets met (respectively Via S. Lorenzo, Via Mario Lupo and Via Gombito). It was built in the 12th century. The structure, consisting of stone blocks, dominates the cityscape, and, even today, given its height, is a key landmark in Upper Bergamo.
In 1206 a fire broke out in the tower during disorders occasioned by struggles between the Suardi and Rivola families, belonging to the opposing Guelph and Ghibelline parties. The tower passed into the hands of Bartolomeo del Zoppo in 1263. The tower remained a defensive structure until the 16th century, after which it took on a non-military role when a workshop was opened up.
In 1848, the tower was used by patriotic rebels against Austrian domination. The aim of the rebels was to turn the soldiers out of the Rocca (fortress) in which the latter were barricaded. Following this action, the Austrian authorities decided to demolish the wooden interior stairway in order to prevent access to the upper part of the tower.
In 1877, since they were no longer able to provide for maintenance of the structure, which was indeed deprived of the means of internal communication, the owners (Agliardi, Arnoldi and Gout) donated the tower to the Municipality. In 1892, in view of the ongoing deterioration of the tower walls, it was decided to build a wooden stairway (the stairway is still in use today)." (Text from the tourist information leaflet).
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The view from the Torre Gombito: Saint Alexander, the patron of Bergamo, on the top of the DuomoOn the Torre Gombito, Upper BergamoThe view from the Torre Gombito
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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
Palácio da Pena
Czy to już jest koniec? :( (widz)
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2005–2017