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Inside the Basilica della Santissima Trinità di Saccargia, the most important Romanesque church of Sardinia. 
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Inside the Basilica della Santissima Trinità di Saccargia, the most important Romanesque church of Sardinia.

"Standing tall and solitary amid the surrounding flat country, its zebra-striped facade and belltower conspicuously mark its Pisan origins. The church was built in 1116, and supposedly owes its remote location to a divine visitation that took place while the giudice of Torres and his wife stopped here on the way to Porto Torres, where they intended to pray for a child at San Gavino's shrine. During the night, a celestial messenger informed the giudice's wife that the pilgrimage was unnecessary since she was already pregnant, whereupon the grateful giudice built an abbey on this spot. [...] Showing elements of Lombard architecture, the stark, tall-naved interior is mostly unadorned, but for a guilded wooden pulpit embedded in one wall and some vivid eleventh- or twelfth-century frescos covering the central apse. These, illustrating scenes from the life of Christ, are attributed to a Pisan artist and are a rare example in Italy of the type of Romanesque mural. Look out, too, for a stone image at the front of the nave on the left, possibly representing Costantino I, the giudice supposed to have founded the church and thought to be buried here." (Robert Andrews: The Rough Guide to Sardinia, 2004).
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Basilica della Santissima Trinità di SaccargiaBasilica della Santissima Trinità di Saccargia - frescos in the apseBasilica della Santissima Trinità di Saccargia - frescos in the apseBasilica della Santissima Trinità di Saccargia - frescos in the apse
Inside the Cathedral of St. Mary and St. Cecilia in Cagliari, the capital of Sardinia, Italy. 
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Inside the Cathedral of St. Mary and St. Cecilia in Cagliari, the capital of Sardinia, Italy.

"The church was built in the 13th century in Pisan-Romanesque style, obtaining cathedral status in 1258. In the 17th and 18th centuries it was renovated along Baroque lines. In the 1930s it finally received the current façade, in Neo-Romanesque style, inspired by Pisa Cathedral.
The church was built by the Pisans in their stronghold overlooking the city, Castel di Castro. It has a square plan, with a nave and two aisles, the latter having cross vaults, while the nave had a wooden ceiling. In 1258, after the Pisans had destroyed the capital of the Giudicato of Cagliari, Santa Igia, and its cathedral, it became the seat of the diocese of Cagliari.
In the 14th century the transept was built, giving the cathedral a Latin cross groundplan, and the two side entrances. The façade received a Gothic mullioned window and the bell tower was also modified. From the same period the first chapel comes, in Italian Gothic style, in the transept's left arm. The right transept was completed after the conquest of Cagliari by the Aragonese, and two additional chapels were built.
In 1618 the presbytery was elevated in order to build a sanctuary for several relics of martyrs. The interior and the façade were re-structured in Baroque style in 1669-1704. A cupola was built at the center of the transept, and the latter's Gothic chapels were removed.
The old façade was demolished in the early 20th century, and replaced by a Neo-Romanesque one, along the same lines of the original design, during the 1930s.
In the interior, the main attraction is the ambo of Guglielmo, a 12th-century pair of pulpits by one Master Guglielmo, originally sculpted for the cathedral of Pisa. It was taken to Cagliari in 1312 and placed in the nave, near to its third column. In 1669 it was split in two, and the two pulpits placed in their current locations. The four marble lions which supported the ambo are now located at the feet of the presbytery balustrade. Sculptures include scenes from the New Testament.
Other artworks include a 15th-century Flemish triptych (also known as Triptych of Clement VII), attributed to Rogier van der Weyden, and the Baroque funerary monument to Bernardo de La Cabra, archbishop of Cagliari, who died in the plague of 1655, while the left transept houses a 14th-century chapel and the mausoleum of the Aragonese King Martin I of Sicily, built in 1676-1680. (Martin died during the conquest of Sardinia in the early 15th century)." (Text from Wikipedia).
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Inside the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Bosa, Sardinia, Italy. 
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Inside the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Bosa, Sardinia, Italy.

"The origins of the cathedral lie in the 12th century, but the building has been substantially altered many times, particularly during the 15th century. The present building is the product of restorations carried out from 1803 onwards by the local architect Salvatore Are. The cathedral was re-consecrated in 1809. The decorations and furnishings were completed during the rest of the 19th century. [...]

The interior has a single nave with a barrel-vaulted roof subdivided into five spans by pilasters and arches, with four side-chapels. The first chapel to the right is the great chapel ("cappellone") of the Sacred Heart, very elongated and arranged like a miniature church in itself, mirroring the cathedral in which it is set: the end part contains four little side chapels and a larger chapel under an octagonal cupola.

The archway leading to the presbytery is narrower than the nave and flanked by two pilasters. The presbytery itself, which is very deep, is covered by an octagonal cupola (planned in the opening years of the 19th century by the architect Domenico Franco) and finished by a semi-circular apse, separated from the nave by a marble balustrade. Three steps lead to the presbytery; at the foot of the central stair are two marble lions. The high altar is also of marble of the 17th century, crowned by statues of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception and of Saints Emilius and Priamus, patrons of the town. To either side of the altar are the inlaid wooden choir stalls. The frescos are by the Parma artist Emilio Scherer, between 1877 and 1878." (Text from Wikipedia).

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The Bosa Duomo: the 19th-century frescoes in the apseThe facade of the Bosa DuomoThe Bosa Duomo
Inside the monumental Art Deco Koekelberg Basilica in Brussels, Belgium. 
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Inside the monumental Art Deco Koekelberg Basilica in Brussels, Belgium.

"The National Basilica of the Sacred Heart (French: Basilique Nationale du Sacré-Coeur, Dutch: Nationale Basiliek van het Heilig-Hart) is a Roman Catholic Minor Basilica and parish church in Brussels. The church was dedicated to the Sacred Heart, inspired by the Basilique du Sacré-Coeur in Paris. Symbolically King Leopold II laid the first stone of the basilica in 1905 during the celebrations of the 75th anniversary of Belgian independence. The construction was halted by the two World Wars and finished only in 1969. Belonging to the Metropolitan Archbishopric of Mechelen-Brussels, it is one of the ten largest Roman Catholic church by area in the world.

Located in the Parc Elisabeth atop the Koekelberg Hill in Brussels' Koekelberg municipality, the church is popularly known as the Koekelberg Basilica (French: Basilique de Koekelberg or Dutch: Basiliek van Koekelberg). The massive brick and concrete reinforced church features two thin towers and a green copper dome that rises 89 metres (292 ft) above the ground, dominating the northwestern skyline of Brussels." (Text from Wikipedia).

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Inside the Koekelberg Basilica in Brussels, Belgium. 
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Inside the Koekelberg Basilica in Brussels, Belgium.

"The church, on Koekelberg hill, is a landmark on the Brussels skyline. It is the largest building in Art Deco style in the world, at 89 m (292 ft) high and 164.5 m (540 ft) long (outside length). The cupola platform affords an excellent city panoramic view of Brussels and the wider area of Flemish-Brabant. The central nave is 141 m (463 ft) long, and at its widest the building is 107 m (351 ft). The cupola has a diameter of 33 m (108 ft). The church accommodates 3500 people.

The building combines reinforced concrete with terracotta layering, bricks, and dimension stone. Belgian painter Anto Carte (1886–1954) designed the eight stained glass windows representing the life of Jesus.

This enormous building houses Catholic Church celebrations in both main Belgian national languages (Dutch and French), as well as conferences, exhibitions (as in 2007–2008, the International Leonardo da Vinci Expo), a restaurant, a Catholic radio station, a theatre and two museums." (Text from Wikipedia).

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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
Palácio da Pena
Czy to już jest koniec? :( (widz)
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2005–2017