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Inside the church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio a Trevi in Rome, Italy. 
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Inside the church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio a Trevi in Rome, Italy.

"In the crypt beneath the church are preserved the hearts and viscera — removed for embalming — of many of the poopes from Sixtus V, who died in 1590, to Leo XIII, who died in 1903. Ss. Vincenzo and Anastasio is the parish church of the Quirinal Palace where most of them lived. However, given time is short, avoid going into the church as the interior is surprisingly disappointing given the splendid façade, having been heavily restored in the nineteenth century." (Georgina Masson: The Companion Guide to Rome, Woodbridge 2009).
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Inside the church of San Lorenzo in Damaso, Piazza della Cancelleria, Rome. 
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Inside the church of San Lorenzo in Damaso, Piazza della Cancelleria, Rome.

Wikipedia: San Lorenzo in Damaso (Saint Lawrence in the House of Damasus) is a basilica church in Rome, Italy, one of several dedicated to the Roman deacon and martyr Saint Lawrence. Known since antiquity (synod of Pope Symmachus, 499) as Titulus Damasi, according to tradition San Lorenzo in Damaso was built by Pope Damasus I in his own house, in the 380s.

Donato Bramante rebuilt the church in the 15th century, by order of Cardinal Raffaele Riario, within the restoration works of the close by Palazzo della Cancelleria. The last restoration was necessary after a fire that damaged the basilica in 1944.

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Inside the Santi Quattro Coronati church on the Caelian Hill in Rome. 
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Inside the Santi Quattro Coronati church on the Caelian Hill in Rome.

Santi Quattro Coronati is an ancient basilica in Rome, Italy. The church dates back to the 4th (or 5th) century, and is devoted to four anonymous saints and martyrs. The complex of the basilica with its two courtyards, the fortified Cardinal Palace with the St. Silvester chapel, and the Monastery with its cosmatesque cloister is built in a silent and green part of Rome, between the Colosseum and San Giovanni in Laterano, in an out-of-time setting.

"Santi Quattro Coronati" means the Four Holy Crowned Ones [i.e. martyrs], and refers to the fact that the saints' names are not known, and therefore referred to with their number, and that they were martyrs, since the crown, together to the branches of palm, is an ancient symbol of martyrdom. According to the Passion of St. Sebastian, the four saints were soldiers who refused to sacrifice to Aesculapius, and therefore were killed by order of Emperor Diocletian (284-305). (Text from Wikipedia).

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Inside the Basilica of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome. 
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Inside the Basilica of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome.

It is one of the Seven Pilgrim Churches of Rome. According to tradition, the basilica was consecrated around 325 to house the Passion Relics brought to Rome from the Holy Land by St. Helena of Constantinople, mother of the Roman Emperor Constantine I. At that time, the basilica floor was covered with soil from Jerusalem, thus acquiring the title in Hierusalem - it is not dedicated to the Holy Cross which is in Jerusalem, but the church itself is "in Jerusalem" in the sense that a "piece" of Jerusalem was moved to Rome for its foundation.

The church is built around a room in St. Helena's imperial palace, Palazzo Sessoriano, which she adapted to a chapel around the year 320. Some decades later, the chapel was turned into a true basilica, called the Heleniana or Sessoriana. After falling into neglect, the church was restored by Pope Lucius II (1144-1145). In the occasion it assumed a Romanesque appearance, with a nave and two aisles, a belfry and a porch. [...] The apse of church includes frescoes telling the Legends of the True Cross, attributed to Melozzo, to Antoniazzo Romano and Marco Palmezzano. (Text from Wikipedia).

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Inside the Church of Domine Quo Vadis in Via Appia Antica in Rome. 
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Inside the Church of Domine Quo Vadis in Via Appia Antica in Rome.

"The Church of St Mary in Palmis, better known as Chiesa del Domine Quo Vadis, is a small church southeast of Rome, central Italy. It is located about some 800 m from Porta San Sebastiano, where the Via Ardeatina branches off the Appian Way, on the site where, according to the legend, Saint Peter met Jesus while the former was fleeing persecution in Rome. According to the apocryphal Acts of Peter, Peter asked Jesus, "Lord, where are you going?" (Latin: Domine, quo vadis?). Jesus answered, "I am going to Rome to be crucified again". There has been a sanctuary on the spot since the ninth century, but the current church is from 1637. The current façade was added in the 17th century." (Text from Wikipedia).
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Imprint of Christ's feet in the Domine Quo Vadis churchBust of Henryk Sienkiewicz in the Domine Quo Vadis church
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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
Palácio da Pena
Czy to już jest koniec? :( (widz)
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